Union Station Farmers Market

There aren’t that many Saturdays left until the Union Station Farmers Market ends for the season on October 22nd. So, savor and take advantage of the goodness while you can. Stop by,  say hello, and pick up some of our heritage Mulefoot pork, produce, or prepared food.

Black Cat Farm market produce

The Black Cat Farm booths at the Boulder and Denver markets will include the following produce on September 24, 2016:
  • Basil (lemon, Genovese, purple for Boulder market; Genovese for Denver market)
  • Beets
  • Broccoli
  • Cabbage (Napa, Savoy)
  • Corn, Boulder-only
  • Cucumbers (salad, pickling)
  • Eggplant
  • Huitlacoche (corn smut)
  • Lettuce, head (Jericho)
  • Lettuce mix
  • Mibuna and Ruby Streaks mizuna
  • Mustard greens
  • Peppers
  • Sorrel
  • Squash (Delicata, spaghetti, summer)
  • Swiss chard
  • Tatsoi
  • Tomatillos
  • Tomatoes (cherry, heirloom, slicers)

Bacon, chorizo, and pork cuts will also be available.

Prepared food

We will also offer the following Black Cat Bistro frozen prepared  dish made with Black Cat Farm heritage pork:

  • Pork green chile: A Colorado staple made according to Eric’s recipe with smoked pork and green tomatoes.
  • Bolognese sauce: Classic Italian meat-based sauce  originating from the city of Bologna, Italy. Often served with pasta.
  • Head cheese: Terrine made from the head of a pig

Corn smut (also known as huitlacoche)

Huitlacoche

Photo by Maja Dumat (https://www.flickr.com/photos/blumenbiene)

This year, we grew a lot more corn than in the past.  An unexpected surprise has been how we have found a lot of corn smut on our ears of corn.  Corn smut, also known as huitlacoche or the Mexican truffle, is a grey fungus that grows on corn. In the Nahuatl language, huitlacoche means “excrement of raven.” We will be bringing huitlacoche to the Boulder and Union Station markets tomorrow.

Corn smut starts inside the husk. As it grows, it bursts through the husk like an alien. Recently, our farm workers found one that was the size of a football.

In Mexico, huitlacoche is seen as a delicacy. It is often combined with chiles in soups, quesadillas, and tamales. It is said to have a smoky earthy flavor. The kitchn website has instructions on how to prepare huitlacoche and links to recipes that use it.