The Black Cat Farm booth at the Boulder Farmers’ Market will include the following produce on October 11, 2014:

  • Arugula
  • Baby bok choy
  • Baby lettuce mix
  • Baby tatsoi
  • Beets, multiple varieties
  • Cabbage (Danish ball head, Savoy)
  • Cardoons
  • Carrots
  • Celeriac
  • Chinese broccoli (Gai lan)
  • Cilantro
  • Eggplant
  • Hinona Kabu, a Japanese turnip
  • Kale
  • Lettuce
  • Mache
  • Mizuna
  • Mustard greens
  • Parsley
  • Peppers (Anaheim, jalapeno. Italian pimento-style bell)
  • Perpetual spinach
  • Radishes, Hailstone, Japanese winter
  • Sorrel
  • Spicy Asian greens mix
  • Spinach
  • Storing onions, several varieties
  • Tomatoes
  • Turnips, Hakurei

Non-produce items available will consist of chicken eggs.

Farmers’ market demo and food film festival lunch!

If you find yourself at the market around 11am or later, take in Eric’s demo and tasting of a dish from his new cookbook, “Farm Fork Food: A Year of Spectacular Recipes Inspired by Black Cat Farm.”  He will also sign copies of the book.

And to dine on an entire meal devoted to dishes adapted from the cookbook,  attend the lunch that Bramble and Hare will hosting for the Flatirons Food Film Festival on Sunday, Oct. 19, 11:45am,  $29. The lunch will include a short talk by Eric and another cookbook signing opportunity. Call (303) 444-5500 (Black Cat Farm-Table-Bistro) or (303) 444-9110  (Bramble and Hare) to make a reservation . For festival information: www.flatironsfoodfilmfest.org

Lunch menu:
For all three courses, there are two choices.
First course
Poached ham with sauce gribiche
Salt-roasted beet salad
Second Course
Braised beef with gnocchi, cardoons, and kale
Confit heirloom carrots with spanakopita, farmers’ cheese, and dolmas
Dessert
Plum clafouti
Pumpkin pound cake with candied pepitas

What is minutina?

Minutina, also known as buckshorn and erba stella, made its first Black Cat Farm appearance ever last weekend.  It is a cold-hardy salad Italian heirloom salad green that can be grown for all four seasons.  Minutina has slender green leaves , a subtle nutty taste, and adds a crunchy texture to salads without fiber. The flower buds are edible, too.